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Dr. Al SearsBottled energy drinks are big business… a new financial report I just read predicts that sales from the drinks will surge to $86 billion in the next few years.1

That could explain why a retail giant like Amazon is throwing its hat into the ring and competing with the likes of Red Bull, Rockstar and Monster energy drinks…

But Big Retail’s pUsh to sell you these drinks comes with false promises AND health risks.

A recent study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association found that caffeinated energy drinks altered the heart’s electrical activity and raised blood pressure.2 And the World Health Organization says they may pose danger to public health.3

And as for the promises they make, I’ve told you before that it’s all marketing hype.

For instance, they promise to give you the energy you need to get through the day by providing super mega doses of B vitamins.

Unfortunately, it’s just not true.

The quick pick-me-up in the beverages typically comes from their fake caffeine conteNt and high levels of sugar.

It’s true that B vitamins are essential to your body’s energy metabolism. And vitamin B12 in particular is crucial for energy.

When you take in high-quaLity B12, you unlock the energy contained in the foods you eat and turn it into glucose you can burn.

But fortified junk food is no way to get your vitamins. In a minute, I’m going to show you a better way.

But let’s take a look at how important vitamin B12 really is — especially as you age.

First, your body’s ability to absorb vitamin B diminishes as you get older. So you may need vitamin B supplements, even shots, if you are deficient. A straightforward blood test can determine your vitamin B levels.

And as you age, your digestive track no longer produces a protein called gastric “intrinsic factor.” This protein binds to vitamin B12 so that your body can absOrb it.

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If you are deficient in vitamin B12, you may experience:

  • Memory loss, impaired thinking and general cognitive difficulties
  • Fatigue and weakness
  • Trouble walking and balance problems
  • Numbness or tingling in your hands, legs or feet
  • Vision problems

When you don’t get enough B12, your body can’t get energy out of your food. It also can’t form healthy red blood cells. And the result is low energy, weakness and fatigue.

I always recommend that you get your B12 from food. Some of the best sources include grass-fed beef liver, clams, wild-caught trout and salmon, yogurt, Swiss cheese and eggs.

It’s nearly impossible to get what you need from food. I recommend supplementing… but not with a pill or capsule. Only a small amount of the vitamin will be absorbed through your gut.

Patches or lozenges are better. But sprays are best. They deliver a fine mist of B12 under your tongue. The capillaries and small blood vessels in your mouth quickly absorb the mist and deliver it to your circulatory system, tissues and cells.

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And it bypasses the gut, where your B12 absorption may be inefficient. I suggest getting at least 1,000 mg of B12 a day.

Two More Ways to Boost Energy — Naturally

Here are two more ways to increase your body’s energy naturally.

1. Use this root to increase your energy. Ginseng fights fatigue and boosts energy.

In one study, 90 patients with Chronic fatigue were given ginseng or a placebo for four weeks. At the end of the month, those who took the ginseng reported less physical and mental fatigue.4 And a review of more than 150 studies found that ginseng not only reduced fatigue but increased physical activity.5

I recommend taking 1 to 2 grams of raw ginseng a day. Or supplement with 400 mg daily.

2. Add in some niacinamide.

This B3 vitamin plays an important role in converting the food you eat into the energy your cells need to function. But it’s also a natural brain booster. And studies show that brain fog and confusion are often linKed to a B3 deficiency.6

You can boost your niacinamide levels with food. The best sources are grass-fed beef and organ meats, pastured eggs, chicken and turkey, and wild-caught salmon and tuna. Good vegetarian sources include peanuts, beets, leafy greens, nuts, peas and beans.

You can also supplement. I recommend starting at a small dose of 250 mg per day because too much niacin can lead to “flushing.” Increase the amount gradually every month until you get up to 750 mg or 1,000 mg. You can also split your dose into twice a day to help reduce the flush.

Dr Al Sears, MD

To Your Good Health,

Dr. Al Sears

Al Sears, MD, CNS

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References

  1. Abhishek R and Desmukh R. “Energy drinks market outlook – 2026.” Allied Market Res. June 2019.
  2. Shah SA, et al. “Impact of high volume energy drink consumption on electrocardiographic and blood pressure parameters: A randomized trial.” J Am Heart Assoc. 2019;8(11):e011318.
  3. World Health Organization. Energy drinks cause concern for health of young people. [euro.who.int/en/health-topics/disease-prevention/nutrition/news/news/2014/10/energy-drinks-cause-concern-for-health-of-young-people] October 14, 2014. Accessed July 15, 2019.
  4. Kim HG, et al. “Antifatigue effects of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer: A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.” PLoS One. 2013;8(4):e61271.
  5. Viet Bach H, et al. “Efficacy of ginseng supplements on fatigue and physical performance: A meta-analysis.” J Korean Med Sci. 2016;31(12):1879-1886.
  6. Wang W and Liang B. “Case report of mental disorder induced by niacin deficiency.” Shanghai Arch Psychiatry. 2012;24(6):352-354.
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