Close
Shopping Cart 0
You have no items in your shopping cart.

Dr. Al SearsPersonally, I don’t put much stock in them. But if you’re willing to fork over $150 and not take it too seriously, it can be fun to see if their information matches up with what you’ve always heard about your family history…

But I hear more and more about people who want to use these DNA kits to discover if they have a serious health risk.

I want to caution you that the results can be misleadinG. Even if the information these test kits give you is accurate.

Today, I want to tell you that you have the power to change your genetic makeup. You can even pass on your memories to your grandchildren and their children.

You see, your genes are only 15% of the total genetic material you got from your parents. The remaining 85% is called the “epigenome.” That’s where the real action is.

Your genes might set your height, and your skin and eye color, but your epigenome does much more. It bosses your genes around by turning them on and off. It controls whether you’re more likely to get your father’s heart disease or your grandmother’s Alzheimer’s.

Genetic Memory Swapping

And just like genes, you can pass on parts of your epigenome to your family.

A new study from a prestigious California university shows that mEmories can even be stored in the epigenome.1 Researchers studied two groups of snails putting each group in a different scenario. They then injected the RNA from the epigenome of one group to the other.

RNA or ribonucleic acid is a cellular messenger. It makes proteins and carries out DNA’s instructions to other parts of the cell.

The result was amazing. Using RNA from the epigenome, the researchers transferred one snail’s memory to another snail.

So what does this mean for humans?

Even though we have about 5,000 times more neurons than a sNail does, they work in a similar way. The researchers hope that this new discovery will lead to therapies where they can restore memories to Alzheimer’s patients. Or it may help rid memories from people with post-traumatic stress syndrome.

All of this proves what I’ve said for a long time. Maybe you can’t change your genes. But you can definitely change how your genes act.

Your epigenome is central command for turning your genes “On” and “off.” In other words, even if you get some really bad genes, your epigenome can silence them.

And the good news is you’re in charge of your epigenome. You get to flip the override switch. It’s not that hard to do…

 

dna, carnivore, lowering blood pressure, Ketogenic diet, lamb chops

 

You Can Take Charge of Your Epigenome Easily and At Home

Mounting evidence proves that comMon foods can change your epigenome.2

Every day I help my patients take control of their DNA with a few powerful nutrients. Here are several you can use at home to turn on good genes and turn off bad ones:

  1. The best is curcumin. This compound comes from the turmeric plant (Curcuma longa). Studies show it has powerful epigenetic activity that fights cancer.3Curcumin is an easy spice to add to your diet. It’s great in curry sauces, scrambled Eggs, deviled eggs, mustard sauces or salad dressings. But to change your DNA I recommend supplements. Look for a product with at least 90% or greater “curcuminoids.” And find one with piperine (an extract from black pepper). It increases the bioavailability of curcumin. Take 500 mg to 1,000 mg a day.
  1. Then add sulforaphane. This compound is found in cruciferous vegetables like broccoli. It’s known to affect the epigenome and even prevent several different types of cancer.4 Other cruciferous vegetables include kale, cabbage, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, bok choy, collards, kohlrabi, mustard greens, rutabaga and turnips. But far and away the best source of sulforaphane is broccoli sprouts. They give you up to 100 times as much as regular broccoli.Aim for at least one serving of these vegetables every single day. If you’re not a fan of eating your veggies every day, you can take a supplement. Look for one made from an extract of broccoli sprouts containing sulforaphane glucosinolate. Take at least 30 mg three times a day but not with food. Take it at least 30 minutes before or after a meal.
  1. And B vitamins from your food are vital. Your cells are constantly dividing and replicating themselves. DNA strands have to unravel, make a copy of your chromosomes, and zip up the DNA again. This process happens billions of times every day. A lot could go wrong. But a lot can go right by adding B vitamins to your diet.Vitamins B12 and B9 (folate) are both key in protecting and repairing your DNA during this process. Here’s how to get them:

 

Vitamin Food Sources Supplement
B9 (folate) Beef, calf’s liver, lamb, pork, chicken liver, eggs, leafy greens 800 mcg
B12 Lamb, beef, herring, mackerel, liver, oysters, poultry, clams, eggs 5,000 mcg

 

 

Dr Al Sears, MD

 

 

 

To Your Good Health,

Dr. Al Sears

 

Al Sears, MD, CNS

 

P.S. I want to prove to you, beyond a shadow of a doubt, that Alzheimer’s is avoidable and can even be reversed. You see, Big Pharma has hidden the true cause of Alzheimer’s — all in the name of bigger and bigger profits.

That’s why I’ve just made a short video revealing the three most effective Alzheimer’s treatments in my clinic. In it, I’ll reveal what Big Pharma doesn’t want you to know. And why these three treatments work so well at preserving your precious memories. Click Here to watch it now.

 

DID YOU FIND THE RED LETTERS?: GENOME

Now you’re ready to fill your shopping cart with tasty, nutritious grass-fed, wild-caught, and free range favorites! Use the Red Letter Discount Code to save. This Discount Code is valid Sunday, August 12 – Wednesday, August 15, 2018. That’s 96 hours to save!

  • Discount code cannot be applied to previous orders.
  • Applies to any order under 40 lbs.
  • Excludes sale items, volume discounts, and gift certificates.

Please note, discount codes cannot be applied to items that are already on sale or discounted.

 

 

References
  1. Bédécarrats A, et al. “RNA from trained Aplysia can induce an epigenetic engram for long-term sensitization in untrained Aplysia.” eNeuro 2018;5(3).
  2. Hardy TM and Tollefsbol TO. “Epigenetic diet: impact on the epigenome and cancer.” Epigenomics. 2011; (4):503-518.
  3. Joseph PV, et al. “Emerging role of nutri-epigenetics in inflammation and cancer.” Oncol Nurs Forum. 2016;43(6):784-788.
  4. Cheung KL and Kong AN. “Molecular targets of dietary phenethyl isothiocyanate and sulforaphane for cancer chemoprevention.” AAPS J. 2010;12(1):87–97.
  5. Fahey JW, et al. “Broccoli sprouts: An exceptionally rich source of inducers of enzymes that protect against chemical carcinogens.” Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1997; 94:10367–10372.
print